Means of occupational therapy in (individual) rehabilitation programs for people with Parkinson’s disease

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14739/2409-2932.2021.3.239791

Keywords:

Parkinson’s disease, rehabilitation, occupational therapy, non-motor symptoms, cognitive and mental disorders

Abstract

The aim of the work is to develop a set of rehabilitation measures including occupational therapy classes for Parkinson’s disease and to assess the objective condition of patients on the scales of non-motor symptoms, cognitive and mental disorders.

Materials and methods. The study of patients was conducted on the basis of anamnesis, objective examination and scales for assessment of non-motor symptoms, cognitive and mental disorders (scale of non-motor symptoms – NMSS, scale of mental disorders – MMSE, Montreal scale of cognitive disorders – MOCA); to assess non-motor symptoms, a patient questionnaire was additionally used to identify autonomic disorders (according to A. M. Wayne, 1998). The control and experimental groups were offered exercise, physiotherapy, massage and nutrition (diet). Occupational therapy was added for the experimental group.

Results. After the physical rehabilitation, the condition of the patients significantly improved. The final score in the experimental group of patients with non-motor manifestations of Parkinson’s disease on the scale of assessment of non-motor symptoms was statistically significantly lower and was 61.04 ± 0.39 (P < 0.01). The final score on the scale of mental disorders was statistically significantly higher – 27.78 ± 0.27 (P < 0.01), on the scale of cognitive changes, it also became statistically significantly higher – 25.13 ± 0.19 (P < 0.01). According to A. M. Wayne’s questionnaire of autonomic disorders, the total score in the control group was 64.0 ± 3.2. In the experimental group of patients, the total score was 51.0 ± 5.4 points (P < 0.01). Thus, under the influence of additional occupational therapy classes, in the experimental group both on the scale of non-motor symptoms and by A. M. Wayne’s, questionnaire there was a statistically significant improvement in the condition of patients.

Conclusions. Based on the results of the study, it can be concluded that there is a significant difference (P < 0.01) in the condition of patients on the final scores, with the pronounced improvement in the condition of the experimental group patients in comparison with the control group patients, following the results of all survey scales. A significant difference is observed on the scale of non-motor symptoms. A certain role in improving the condition of patients with appropriate screening using study scales and a patient questionnaire to identify autonomic disorders (according to A. M. Wayne, 1998), apparently played a component of the rehabilitation program, which further included occupational therapy classes.

Author Biographies

O. I. Antonova, Kremenchuk Mykhailo Ostrohradskyi National University, Ukraine

PhD, Associate Professor of the Department of Human Health and Physical Culture

S. O. Sorokina, Kremenchuk Mykhailo Ostrohradskyi National University, Ukraine

Senior Lecturer of the Department of Human Health and Physical Culture

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Published

2021-10-25

How to Cite

1.
Antonova OI, Sorokina SO. Means of occupational therapy in (individual) rehabilitation programs for people with Parkinson’s disease. CIPM [Internet]. 2021Oct.25 [cited 2023Dec.1];14(3):382-9. Available from: http://pharmed.zsmu.edu.ua/article/view/239791

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Original research